Untitled

Notes on potential projects.

In particular Poste Restante:
The art object seen as an undelivered letter, held in reserve by the gallery for a recipient whose identity and location are incompletely known.

Collected by Eric Fredericksen
ecfredericksen at gmail dot com

Dec 5

Nov 7

Oct 6

Jun 15


Jan 9

Nov 28
“What is irreplaceable in the work of art? What makes it far more a voice of the spirit, whose analogue is found in all productive philosophic or political thought, than a means to pleasure? The fact that it contains, better than ideas, matrices of ideas—the fact that it provides us with symbols whose meaning we never stop developing. Precisely because it dwells and makes us dwell in a world we do not have the key to, the work of art teaches us to see and ultimately gives us something to think about as no analytical work can; because when we analyze an object, we find only what we have put into it.” Merleau-Ponty, “Indirect Language and the Voices of Silence,” reproduced in F.R. David, “Keep it to Yourself,” Spring 2009, p. 184

Nov 18
“If we consider the [art] works in their untouched actuality and do not deceive ourselves, the result is that the works are as naturally present as are things. The picture hangs on the wall like a rifle or a hat. A painting, e.g. the one by Van Gogh that represents a pair of peasant shoes, travels from one exhibition to another. Works of art are shipped like coal from the Ruhr and logs from the Black Forest.” Heidegger, “The Origin of the Work of Art.” Poetry, Language, Thought, Harper & Row, 1975.

Vito Acconci’s contribution to “557,087,” curated by Lucy Lippard for the Contemporary Art Council of the Seattle Art Museum, 1969.

Vito Acconci’s contribution to “557,087,” curated by Lucy Lippard for the Contemporary Art Council of the Seattle Art Museum, 1969.


Sep 1
“'There's more evidence to come yet, please your Majesty,' said the White Rabbit, jumping up in a great hurry; 'this paper has just been picked up.'
‘What’s in it?’ said the Queen.
‘I haven’t opened it yet,’ said the White Rabbit, ‘but it seems to be a letter, written by the prisoner to—to somebody.’
‘It must have been that,’ said the King, ‘unless it was written to nobody, which isn’t usual, you know.’”
Lewis Carroll, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Brought to our attention by Dieter Roelstraete in F.R. David, Winter 2009. http://www.deappel.nl/publications/p/132/ 

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